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Trees of the mount alexander region


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TREES OF THE MOUNT ALEXANDER REGION

Tog’s Place Café 2016



1. Bundy Eucalytus nortonii

and Yellow Box Eucalyptus melliodora



Spring Gully

Photo by Bernard Slattery


January 2016
A common and puzzling feature of goldfields landscapes is the number of trees growing out of mullock heaps. Surprisingly, there are plant nutrients in these apparently sterile piles of rocks, and sometimes the trees on them are bigger than those on surrounding flat ground. These two, however, have struggled to find a foothold on a steep slope near Spring Gully Central mine.
$95 framed $70 unframed

2. Red Box
Eucalyptus polyanthemos

Golden Point

Photo by Bernard Slattery


August 2015
Maybe the most striking feature of the Red Box is its greyish, rounded leaves, but a burst of garish sunlight in the late afternoon of a winter’s day gave this distant tree an almost unnatural golden look.
$95 framed $70 unframed

3. Death Throes

Yellow Box
Eucalyptus melliodora

Rise and Shine Bushland Reserve

Photo by Damian Kelly


November 2015
The bark of the Yellow Box is quite variable, and it’s not unusual to see weirdly contorted shapes on the bark, especially of older trees. In this case, the twisted lines add drama to the sight of the dying tree.
$95 framed $70 unframed

4. Red Gum Regeneration

Eucalyptus camaldulensis subsp. camaldulensis

Walkers Swamp

Photo by Damian Kelly


September 2011
The flood years provided much needed regenerative life to our Red Gums, and made local swamps great places to visit. This photo was taken early in the morning, and the slanted light gave a ghostly look to these noble trees, bleaching the trunks and giving the greyish green leaves a pale, golden look.
$95 framed $70 unframed

5.Swift Parrot Lathamus discolour feeding in Ironbark

Muckleford

Photo by Deborah Worland


August 2014
‘Swifties’ breed in eastern Tasmania over summer, then in winter almost the entire population migrates north to the mainland, sometimes as far north as Brisbane. Most of them stay around Victoria, however, and here they feed on winter-flowering eucalypts and wattles. Eucalypt species utilised include the winter-flowering Grey Box, Red Ironbark, Mugga Ironbark, Yellow Gum, White Box and Red Gum (DSE 2002).
$75 framed $55 unframed

6. Buloke
Allocasuarina luehmannii

Moolort Plains

Photo by Geoff Park

January 2016
Buloke woodlands were once widespread across the Moolort Plains. Today, only small remnants
and isolated paddock trees remain.
$95 framed $70 unframed


7.Long-leaved Box

Eucalyptus goniocalyx

Sutton Grange

Photo by Bronwyn Silver

June 2015
Long-leaved Box is one of our most characterful trees, with a spreading habit which can look simply untidy, but more often is like a magnificent sprawl. Clearing history on our public land means that the best specimens—like this ancient tree in Sutton Grange—are on private farmland.
$95 framed $70 unframed

8. Eastern Yellow Robin
Eopsaltria australis


Rise and Shine Bushland Reserve

Photo by Geoff Park
August 2013
‘An Eastern Yellow Robin’s nest is a work of art – there is no other way to describe it. Thin strips of Red Stringybark and flakes of Box (Yellow and Long-leaved) are delicately woven into the rim, or stitched to form a hanging skirt around the side of the nest. The final result is a perfectly disguised cup, ready for laying. ‘ (Geoff’s Natural Newstead blog)
$75 framed $55 unframed

9. Red Gum
Eucalyptus camaldulensis subsp. camaldulensis

Goldsmith Crescent, Castlemaine

Photo by Jen Thomas

January 2016
Red Gum: it’s the iconic Australian tree, found in all mainland states. Stand near a big one, and you can be filled with awe. This tree predates the town of Castlemaine. The Red Gum ‘connects time, place, people, land and water, desert and forest. [Its] story is the history of our continent.’ (Peter Coloff). (Oh, don’t stand too close—Red Gums drop branches without warning.)
$75 framed $55 unframed

10. Yellow Box
Eucalyptus melliodora

Glenluce


Photo by Ern Perkins

August 2009


One of our most famous honey trees, the Yellow Box can sometimes match the Red Gum for grandeur of habit. Some noble specimens can be observed from the Glenluce-Drummond Road, on farmland.
$95 framed $70 unframed

11. Red Gum

Eucalyptus camaldulensis subsp.camaldulensis

Bells Swamp

Photo by Chris Worland

November 2011
Compare the colour of the foliage on these trees with the trees in Damian Kelly’s Walkers Swamp photo to see the effect that light can have on colour. Floods can be disastrous for those in their way, but they’re a natural (and essential) part of our landscape, and the revitalisation of our swamps was an inspiring feature of the wet years.
$95 framed $70 unframed

12. Yellow Gum

Eucalyptus leucoxylon subsp. Pruinosa

Walmer
Photo by Mitchell Parker

January 2016


The stately Yellow Gum is a feature of many parts of our region. One of its most attractive features is the extraordinary colour variations on the trunk as it sheds its bark in the summer months. This photo was taken after rain added a sheen to the green colour of the new bark.
$75 framed $55 unframed

13. Red Gum

Eucalyptus camaldulensis subsp. camaldulensis

Plaistow Homestead, Joyces Creek

Photo by Geoff Park

February 2016
The land around Plaistow was selected by a
Colin MacKinnon, who selected it in 1840. This magnificent River Red Gum certainly pre-dates
this first wave of pastoral settlement and would have been a feature of the country of the Jaara people for perhaps the past 500 years.
$95 framed $70 unframed

14. Shafts of Light

Fryerstown

Photo by Marion Williams
July 2014

Angled morning or afternoon light is often best for showing the features of our bush, as in this photo. The defining tree on the right is a Yellow Gum.
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15. Scar Tree

Golden Point Road

Photo by John Ellis


December 2015
The scar on this tree is an eloquent reminder of Aboriginal life in this region, and of the different layers of meaning in our landscapes. The tree is a Yellow Box Eucalyptus melliodora, a battle scarred veteran of other times.
$95 framed $70 unframed

16. Nankeen Kestrel

Falco cenchroides

Moolort Plains

Photo by Patrick Kavanagh


January 2014
Tree hollows are vital for the survival of much of our wildlife, so even dead trees can be important features of the land. The photo shows one of three fledglings raised in this hollow on the Moolort Plains. The other two have just ventured from the nest. This one seems to be stretching in preparation for the big step out.
$95 framed $70 unframed

17. Yellow Gum landscape

Red, White & Blue track,

Muckleford

Photo by Harley Parker
April 2014
Yellow Gums have distinctly cream (or, in summer, multi coloured) bark, are characteristically straight trunked and grow to a reasonable height, so to be in a Yellow Gum woodland is to have the impression of moving between stately columns, as in much of the Muckleford area forests.
$95 framed $70 unframed

18 Shell Lerp on Eucalyptus leaf

Strangways

Photo by Patrick Kavanagh

January 2015
Our trees are hosts to an amazing variety of life forms, and the macro lens can reveal sights barely visible (or effectively invisible) to the naked eye: in this case, what could seem to be an anonymous brown crust on a Grey Box Eucalyptus microcarpa leaf turns out to be a beautifully formed ‘shell’: the Shell Lerp Spondyliaspis bancrofti. We’re not sure what the smaller scattered objects are.
$75 framed $55 unframed

19. Buloke

Allocasuarina luehmannii

Strathlea

Photo by Frances Cincotta


April 2006
The 1852 Selwyn map shows much of our landscape as dotted with ‘sheoak’, or Buloke, now sadly depleted. Some patches remain, however, and there are encouraging signs of regrowth in parts of the region.
$75 framed $55 unframed

20. Acacia Horned Treehopper Sextius virescens on Golden Wattle Acacia pycnantha
Strangways

Photo by Patrick Kavanagh


December 2015

Seen side on, the tree hopper looks like a tiny cicada (less than 10 mm long), but the front view shows why it has its name. The insect is found on wattles in many parts of Australia; it’s slow moving, but a pretty good jumper when necessary. It’s often attended by ants, who protect it in return for feeding on a secretion produced by the Hopper.
$75 framed $55 unframed
21. Yellow Gum

Eucalyptus leucoxylon subsp. pruinosa

South German Track, Muckleford Forest

Photo by Janet Barker


April 2009
Summer – especially in a dry year – is a poor time for wildflowers, but some consolation can be found in the spectacular colour variations in Yellow Gum bark, which can sometimes resemble semi-abstract landscapes.
$75 framed $55 unframed

22. Immature Long-leaved Box Eucalyptus goniocalyx leaves

Fryerstown

Photo by Marion Williams


June 2015
A characteristic of some eucalypts is that a single tree can carry strikingly different shaped leaves. A single Long-leaved Box can have three distinct leaf shapes: juvenile or sucker leaves are rounded (and frankly quite cute, like the pictured samples); intermediate leaves can be long (up to 30 cm!); mature leaves longish (to 22 cm).
$75 framed $55 unframed

23. Long-leaved Box Eucalyptus goniocalyx juvenile leaf

Strangways

Photo by Patrick Kavanagh


September 2014
The juvenile leaf of the Long-leaved Box is rounded, with a heart shaped dip – quite different from the adult leaves of the same species, which are long and spear shaped. The juvenile leaves don’t grow into adults: they’re the leaf found on a very young tree [or on a sucker branch on an older tree]. Healthy juveniles are grey green (see Marion William’s photo, Immature Long-leaved Box leaves): this macro shot highlights the veins and oil spots on a decaying leaf.
$95 framed $70 unframed




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