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Safe at sea with satellites


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Safe at sea with satellites
At sea, space technology is used to help save lives every day: managing traffic between ships, picking up migrants and refugees in distress or spotting oil spills. The European Space Agency is once again at the forefront developing new technologies and satellites: to keep us safe at sea and to monitor the environment. Space makes a difference here on Earth and certainly at sea where there is no infrastructure.

10:00:00

ESA leader

10:00:10

Title: Safe at sea with satellites

Ext - shots of sea, ships – Lisbon Portugal,Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Ext – Shots of Italian coast guard rescuing Migrants at sea – Mediterranean Southern Italy, Summer 2015 – Guardia Costiera

Int – Controlcenter Guardia Costiera - Fiumicino port, Italy, Sept 2015 - EURONEWS

Ext –Guardia Costiera at sea inside and outside boat - Fiumicino port, Italy, Sept 2015 - EURONEWS


With 70% of the Earth’ surface covered in water, it is no surprise that since the dawn of time humankind has looked towards the sea as a source of food, wealth and prosperity. However it can also be unforgiving and a place of tragedy; a fact we are reminded of too often these days with migrants risking their lives to reach Europe, here on the Mediterranean.

Nowadays we rely on modern satellite technology to monitor and aid human activities at sea. Satellites are the most powerful tools we have to receive information from the vast blue gaps of infrastructure which are our oceans and seas.



10:00:47

EXT – Outside EMSA building – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015 - EURONEWS



ITW Carsten Tobehn, SAT-AIS Project manager, ESA

01.09 For maritime space has a broad range of applications. You start with GPS but you want maybe to have a backup, making a position and location of your ships, so that’s the Galileo system. And you have earth observation, which is making earth observation satellites for radar and visual, which we also need to look at ships. Then we have telecommunications, to transmit transponder signals, communications forward and backward to the ships, where I am working on, so it’s the combination of all these things that contributes to the maritime safety.01.43



10:01:22

Animation – EDRS satellite in space, date unknown – Eutelsat

Animation – Galileo satellites in formation in space, date unknown – ESA

Animation – global satellite coverage, date unknown – ESA

Animation – exactEarth satellite, date unknown – Canada

Animation – EDRS satellite in space, date unknown – Eutelsat

Animation – AIS explanation - ESA

Ext - shots of sea, ships – Lisbon Portugal,Sept 2015 – EURONEWS



These goals cannot be achieved by just one satellite. That is why you need to use the data from a fleet of satellites. With many of these satellites being developed by ESA, the European space agency plays a vital role in keeping the seas safe and helping people in need. ESA also develops and works on AIS - the automatic identifier system. This is a solution for identifying and locating vessels which has been made mandatory by the international maritime organisation for all big boats and passenger ships. Today, AIS information supplements marine radar, which continues to be the primary method of collision avoidance for water transport nowadays.

10:02:04

EXT – Outside EMSA building – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Int – EMSA controlroom and screens with ships movements – EMSE Lisbon Portugal, sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Animation – Image of port of Athens, Oct 2015 – ESA



ITW Carsten Tobehn, SAT-AIS Project manager, ESA

The system is a collaborative system and if a captain does not witch on by intention or forgot or there is a failure in the equipment, you have not information. So the challenge is how to detect ships which do not transmit this identification signals. First we can use a lot of algorithms to distinguish a ship coming for this side or that side. If the ships is transmitting but not saying where I am, you can make a triangulation and you know where the ship is even though if the ship doesn’t tell you// even though if the ships is not using anything you can// use radar images and then you see the metal object in the ocean and you know there is a ship.



10:02:40

Animation – Sentinel-1 satellite in space scanning, unknown date –ESA

Animation – Sentinel-2 satellite deploying solarpanel, unknown date – ESA

Ext – Shots of ESMA building – Lisbon, Portugal, sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Int– Shots of ESMA controlroom – Lisbon, Portugal, sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Ext –Guardia Costiera at sea inside and outside boat - Fiumicino port, Italy, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Int– Shots of ESMA controlroom – Lisbon, Portugal, sept 2015 – EURONEWS


An example of such radar satellites are the Sentinel satellites in low earth orbit for the EU/ ESA Copernicus programme. All this satellite data has to be processed and this is done at the EMSA or European maritime safety agency in Lisbon. They cross-check the AIS- identification data, for instance, with optical satellite images and so they can see the ships that could be involved in illegal activities such as human trafficking. This data is of huge help for coastguards as they now can target ships that try to avoid detection. But the satellites not only keep us safe at sea: they also aid in protecting the seas from us. Satellites, even though not perfect, are an invaluable tool in combating pollution such as an oil spill at sea.

10:03:27

INT– EMSA controlroom – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

INT- EMSA Controlroom inserts – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015


ITW Leendert Bal, Head of Operations, EMSA in Maritime Support Services at EMSA

we want to know who’s the vessel, who’s the polluter. We can cross check with the data we have on the system where we have the information on the ship positions. We can overlay this information, put it on top of the satellite image, you see nicely the ship and the track it followed and the spill itself. So here we have a perfect match. 01.46



10:03:49

Ext - shots of sea, ships – Lisbon Portugal,Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Animation – Sentinel-1 in space, unknown date – ESA

Animation – Sentinel-3 in space, unknown date – ESA

Animation – Sentinel-2 circling the globe, unknown Date – ESA

Int – Controlcenter Guardia Costiera - Fiumicino port, Italy, Sept 2015 - EURONEWS



The seas and oceans are one of our most precious resources and we must protect them to benefit ourselves. This is a task in which ESA continues to take the forefront: building and deploying earth observation satellites, monitoring our seas, adding more satellites every year and increasing the quality of services.

10:04:10

B-ROLL

EXT – Outside EMSA building – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS

Int – EMSA controlroom



ITW Carsten Tobehn, SAT-AIS Project manager, ESA, ENGLISH

  • On the fleet of satellites

  • Working on two levels at ESA, tools available today and what are the tools.

  • What does ESA do for Safety at sea

  • We know where the ships are and what is AIS

10:06:59

INT– EMSA controlroom – Lisbon, Portugal, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS




ITW Leendert Bal, Head of Operations, EMSA in Maritime Support Services at EMSA, ENGLISH -

  • How space is used to monitor the member states seas, example of polution




10:08:51

EXT-shots of Lisbon City, Harbor and Sea – Shots, Sept 2015 –EURONEWS (7 Shots)

10:10:12

EXT- Shots Italian coast guard in action, Port of Fumicino, Sept 2015 – EURONEWS (11 Shots)

10:11:58

END


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