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National recovery plan for the yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) Petaurus australis unnamed subspecies Title


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5. Management practices

Most habitat of the yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) is within the protected area estate managed by DERM. Management includes the implementation of appropriate fire regimes, minimising the impact of cattle and enhancing wildlife corridors. The provisions of the Vegetation Management Act 1999 are the main tools for limiting habitat clearing/modification of eucalypt forest on private land. Any harvesting of native forest on freehold properties is regulated under a code enforced by the Vegetation Management Act 1999 and the Sustainable Planning Act 2009.


A range of other Wet Tropics planning mechanisms provide conservation and habitat management guidance, and include:

  • the Wet Tropics Terrain Regional Plan

  • Wet Tropics NRM Plans

  • Local Government planning schemes

  • the Wet Tropics Conservation Strategy

Several further State and Local Government planning mechanisms (e.g. Local Government planning schemes and nature refuge agreements under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act 1992) have a statutory basis.
The Commonwealth EPBC Act deals with matters of national environmental significance (e.g. World Heritage, threatened species) on public and private land. Proponents of development applications need to demonstrate that significant impacts as defined under the EPBC Act are unlikely to occur.
Management guidelines to prevent significant adverse impacts on the yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) habitat include the following:

  • Retain all veteran rose gums as potential den trees.

  • Retain all feed trees and ensuring their connectivity to den trees.

  • Protect important habitat outside protected area estate.

  • Prevent rainforest encroachment on wet eucalypt open forest.

  • Implement fire regimes that support old growth refuge and mixed age forests.

  • Plan and implement landscape corridors and ‘stepping stones’ to facilitate wet eucalypt open forest migration under climate change.

  • Prevent further habitat fragmentation and the widening of existing habitat breaks.

  • Remove cattle from protected area estate.

  • Implement appropriate grazing regimes on private and leasehold land.

  • Monitor yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) habitat and subpopulations.


6. Estimated costs

Objective

Action if implemented

Year1($)

Year2($)

Year3($)

Year4($)

Year5($)

Total($)

1. Determine essential habitat

1.1 Define essential habitat distribution.

20,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

24,000

2. Implement fire regimes to maintain essential habitat and control rainforest expansion on protected area estate

2.1 Implement adaptive fire management for yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics).

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

100,000

3. Protect and manage habitat outside protected area estate

3.1 Facilitate the protection and management of habitat outside protected area estate.

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

25,000

3.2 Regenerate habitat corridors between existing glider habitat.

0

0

20,000

20,000

20,000

60,000

4. Research the impact of cattle and barbed wire on gliders and glider habitat

4.1 Conduct research into the impacts of cattle on glider habitat.

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

25,000

4.2 Collate existing data on yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) barbed wire incidents and establish a reporting process through WildNet.


5,000

2,000

0

0

0

7,000

4.3 Analyse yellow-bellied glider (Wet Tropics) barbed wire incident data to establish level of impact and identify potential hotspot locations for management.

0

2,000

0

2,000

0

4,000

4.4 Implement an extension program for landholders on appropriate grazing regimes and fencing modification in glider habitat.

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

10,000

5. Assess and monitor glider population



5.1 Undertake a monitoring program to assess the number of gliders in known habitat.

10,000

10,000

10,000

5,000

5,000

40,000

5.2 Conduct genetic analysis of yellow-bellied (Wet Tropics) population.

10,000

10,000

0

0

0

20,000

6. Improve understanding of climate change impacts

6.1 Investigate impacts of climate change on glider habitat.

0

0

0

5,000

5,000

10,000




Estimated total cost per year ($)

77,000

57,000

63,000

65,000

63,000

325,000


7. Evaluation of recovery plan

An annual assessment will be conducted to assess progress towards recovery. This will include an evaluation of the overall progress as well as progress made on individual actions. A review of the recovery plan will be undertaken five years from its adoption and in accordance with the Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC guidelines). Completion of actions within this plan may require reporting by contributors to DSEWPaC. Reporting will also be available through DERM’s Recovery Action Database (an interactive web-based information system) which is currently in development.



Acknowledgments

This recovery plan was prepared by Lee Halasz of the former EPA, Lara Connell and Sarah Parker-Webb of DERM. Significant contribution by Peter Latch and John Winter of the former EPA is greatly appreciated. Thanks also go to all those who provided valuable comments on the plan.




List of Abbreviations

ARC Aboriginal Rainforest Council

AWC Australian Wildlife Conservancy

BHA Bush Heritage Australia

CSIRO The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

DEEDI Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

DERM Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management

DSEWPaC Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

EPBC Act Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

GAC Girringun Aboriginal Corporation

JCU James Cook University

MTSRF Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility

NCA Queensland Nature Conservation Act 1992

RRRC Reef and Rainforest Research Centre Limited

Terrain NRM Terrain Natural Resource Management

TKMG Tree Kangaroo and Mammal Group

TREAT Trees for the Evelyn and Atherton Tableland

WPSQ Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland

VMA Queensland Vegetation Management Act 1999

WTMA Wet Tropics Management Authority

WTWHA Wet Tropics World Heritage Area
References

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