Ana səhifə

Makerere university college of humanities and social sciences school of social sciences


Yüklə 0.7 Mb.
səhifə1/40
tarix13.06.2016
ölçüsü0.7 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   40


PROMOTION OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORK TOWARDS SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND POVERTY REDUCTION IN EAST AFRICA- PROSOWO

The Role of Social Work in Poverty Reduction and Realization of Millennium Development Goals in East Africa

UGANDA COUNTRY REPORT

DRAFT

MAKERERE UNIVERSITY

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK & SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION

P.O BOX 7062

KAMPALA

NOVEMBER, 2012




TABLE OF CONTENTS




TABLE OF CONTENTS i

LIST OF TABLES vii

LIST OF FIGURES viii

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ix

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY xi

CHAPTER ONE 1

INTRODUCTION 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Study Background 1

1.2.1 Socio-economic context 1

1.2.2 The PROSOWO project 2

1.3 Study purpose, objectives and key questions 3

1.3.1 Study purpose 3

1.3.2 Objectives of the study 3

1.4 Conceptual Framework 5

1.4.1 Poverty 5

1.4.2 Social Development 6

1.4.3 Millennium Development Goals 6

1.4.4 Gender Equality 7

1.4.5 Professional Social Work 8

1.4.6 Culturally Relevant Social Work 8

1.5 Organisation of the Report 9

CHAPTER TWO 10

STUDY APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY 10

2.1 Introduction 10

2.2 Research Design 10

2.3 Study Population 11

2.4 Study Area 11

2.5 Sample and Selection Procedures 11

2.5.1 Social welfare agencies 11

2.5.2 Practitioners and employers 12

Table 1 Study regions, districts and respondents 12

2.5.3 Higher education institutions, educators and students 12

Table 2 Higher Education Institutions, educators and students 12

2.5.4 Social work clients 13

2.5.5 National level key informants 13

2.6 Data Collection: Methods, tools and techniques 13

2.6.1 Primary data 14

2.6.2 Secondary data 14

2.7 Data Management and Reporting 15

2.7.1 Data processing 15

2.7.2 Data analysis 15

2.8 Research Clearance and other Ethical Issues 16

2.9 Quality Assurance 16

2.10 Study Limitations 16

CHAPTER THREE 18

PROFILES OF AGENCIES AND STUDY PARTICIPANTS 18

3.1 Introduction 18

3.2 Profile of Social Welfare Agencies 18

Table 3 Agency category, sector, locality and district 18

3.3 Profiles of Social Work Practitioners, Employers and Students 19

3.3.1 Social work practitioners 19

Table 4 Socio-demographic characteristics of social work practitioners 19

3.3.2 Socio-demographic characteristics of social worker employers 21

3.3.3 Social work students 21

Table 5 Characteristics of social work students 21

CHAPTER FOUR 22

SOCIAL WORK, POVERTY AND MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS 22

4.1 Introduction 22

4.2 Overview of national policies and programmes on social development and poverty eradication 22

4.3 Magnitude and Manifestations of Poverty: Perspectives from Practitioners and other Stakeholders 27

Figure 1 Practitioners' estimation of poverty levels among clients 28

Plate 1 A makeshift market in northern Uganda 29

4.4 Major actors in Poverty reduction/social development programs 30

4.5 Contribution to Poverty Reduction and other Millennium Development Goals 31

4.5.1 General Contribution 31

Figure 2 Agency and practitioner’s contribution to poverty reduction 31

Figure 3 Agency and practitioners' level of contribution to other MDGs 32

4.5.2 Specific areas of contribution to Millennium Development Goals 33

Figure 4 Concrete areas of contribution to MDG 1 33

Figure 5 Concrete area of contribution in gender equality 34

Figure 6 Areas of contribution in the health related MDGs 35

Figure 7 Area of contribution in environmental protection 36

Figure 8 Concrete area of contribution in developing global partnerships 37

CHAPTER FIVE 38

THE NATURE OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 38

5.1 Introduction 38

5.2 Human service agencies employing social workers 38

Figure 9 Key sector and agency category where social worker was employed 39

Table 6 Agency categories by the sectors in which social work practitioners were employed 39

5.3 Population targeted by the human service agencies 40

Figure 10 Agency's major target population 40

Table 7 Major target population within districts 41

5.4 Level of Social work Intervention 42

Table 8 Level of intervention by agencies in the studied districts 42

Figure 11 Level of intervention by target group 42

5.5 Proportion of qualified social workers 43

Figure 12 Estimated proportion of qualified social workers in agency labourforce 43

Table 9 Estimated proportion of qualified social workers in the studied districts 44

5.6 Developmental and remedial social work: Approaches used by Practitioners 45

Figure 13 Major focus of interventions and overall approach adopted 45

Figure 14 Specific roles and methods used by social workers 46

5.7 Perspectives on and contribution to social development and poverty reduction 47

5.7.1 Construction of the concept of social development 47

5.7.2 Estimated levels of social workers’ contribution to poverty reduction and social development 49

Table 10 Social workers' self assessment of their contribution to poverty reduction 49

5.7.3 Activities undertaken by social workers for poverty reduction and social development 50

5.7.4 Priority Roles and Interventions for poverty reduction 52

Table 11 Priority interventions for poverty reduction 52

5.8 Professional identity 55

Table 12 Feelings about being a social worker 55

Figure 15 Awareness, membership and willingness to join professional association 56

5.9 Challenges facing the social work profession 56

CHAPTER SIX 58

SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION AND TRAINING 58

6.1 Introduction 58

6.2 Policy and legal environment for social work education 58

6.3 Social Work Training 60

6.3.1 Scope of the social work curriculum 60

Figure 16 Educators' description of the underlying approach to the curriculum 62

Figure 17 Educators' perceptions on which MDGs are currently prioritized in the curriculum 63

Figure 18 Level of alignment of curriculum to global standards 64

6.3.2 General perceptions of educators about the social work curriculum 64

Table 13 Educators' perceptions on the extent to which the curriculum equips students with skills and competences in key output areas for social development 65

6.3.3 Key qualifications of social work educators 67

Figure 19 Highest qualification attained by social work educators 67

Table 14 Highest qualification of educator by HEI 68

6.3.4 Materials and methods used in teaching 69

Table 15 Source of teaching materials (Educators' responses) 69

6.4 Contribution to Research and Policy Development 69

Figure 20 Educators' contribution to policy development 70

6.5 Perceptions of Practitioners about the Social Work Training 70

Table 16 Practitioners' perceptions about social work training 71

6.6 Experiences and Perceptions of Current Students about the Social Work Curriculum 71

6.6.1 Description of the curriculum 72

Table 17 Students' description of the curriculum by institution category 72

Table 18 Students' description of curriculum by academic program 73

6.6.2 Reference materials for students 73

Table 19 Source of reference materials in different institutions 73

6.6.3 Research as part of the curriculum 74

Table 20 Students' research projects as part of the curriculum 74

6.6.4 Field work 75

Figure 21 Whether students undertook fieldwork and placement locality 76

Figure 22 Agency category and service orientation during field work 77

6.6.5 Employment aspirations of social work students 78

Figure 23 Students' employment aspirations by concentration of practice and sex of respondent 78

6.6.6 Students’ Awareness of Millennium Development Goals 79

Figure 24 Are you aware of the UN Millennium Development Goals? 80

Table 21 Specific MDGs that students felt more competent to contribute to 80

6.6.7 Students’ assessment of the curriculum in respect of key aspects of social development 81

Table 22 Extent to which the curriculum addressed various aspects of social development 81

CHAPTER SEVEN 83

CONTEXTUALIZATION OF SOCIAL WORK 83

7.1 Introduction 83

7.2 Clients’ experience of social work 83

7.3 Desired Social Changes in Society: Priority Areas for Intervention 85

7.4 Problems and challenges faced by Social Work Clients 87

7.5 Coping Strategies Adopted by Social Work Clients 88

7.6 Culturally Relevant Social Work Practice 90

7.6.1 Practitioners perspectives on the relevance of culture in practice 90

Figure 25 Impact of culture on social development and the practice of social work 91

Figure 26 To what extent did social work training prepare practitioner to work in diverse culture settings? 92

7.6.2 Local knowledge systems that can inform a culturally relevant practice 92

7.6.3 Towards adoption of indigenous knowledge 94

CHAPTER EIGHT 97

PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER, POVERTY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 97

8.1 Introduction 97

8.2 Perceptions on Gender and Gender Equality 97

8.3 Gender, Poverty and Social Development 99

8.4 Gender in Social Work Education and Training 104

8.5 Role of Social Work in Promoting Gender Equality 105

CHAPTER NINE 107

STRENGTHENING THE ROLE OF SOCIAL WORK IN SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 107

9.1 Introduction 107

9.2 Policy level 107

9.3 Training Level 108

9.4 Practice Level 109

9.5 Suggested Areas for Further Research 110

REFERENCES 111

APPENDICES 113

Appendix 1: Other problems commonly presented to social workers 113

Appendix 2: Specific tasks of social workers at Micro, mezzo and Macro levels 115

Appendix 3: Specific activities undertaken by the social workers for poverty reduction 117

Appendix 4 Selected Indicators for gender equality and women’s empowerment in Uganda 119



  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©kagiz.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət