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Gef medium Sized Project Grant Proposal sustainable land management in the zambian miombo woodland ecosystem


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B. Incremental Cost Assessment



Baseline Project
The Government is currently implementing the Agricultural Sector Investment Programme (ASIP), which is funded by a variety of donors, including the World Bank, UNDP and Sida. ASIP has a number of components including extension, research, marketing, and animal production and health. ASIP has been extended to December 2001, and project preparation for the ASIP successor project is currently on-going. The successor project is expected to commence mid-2002.
The ASIP successor project will serve as GEF baseline project. The objectives of the nation-wide ASIP programme are the promotion of rural development in its broadest sense and agricultural production in particular. In order to achieve this, the GRZ is using in particular the ‘PEA’ extension approach, in which farmers’ communities are motivated to identify and address, with help from extension staff, their development priorities. However, in order to enable communities to make the fundamental shift from chitemene to sustainable land management, an intensive, participatory training, beyond the more general PEA programme, through FFSs on CF and IEM is required, as well as support to obtain the first batch of required inputs. Therefore, it is expected that in the baseline situation, the ongoing degradation of the Miombo woodlands cannot be stopped.
GEF Alternative
Building upon the experiences with participatory extension developed under the baseline project and the experiences with CF and IEM derived from various research and local activities, the GEF alternative will provide a broader and more intensive support to farmers to enable them to shift to a sustainable land management system, including support to take up community-based IEM on lands released from slash-and-burn activities. The project will be implemented in an area that contains important carbon stocks and four protected areas, and that is highly threatened by deforestation and soil degradation.

Incremental Benefits

Important global benefits of the project are the sequestration of carbon and protection of biodiversity. The total carbon sequestration that will be achieved as a result of the project is estimated at 958,000 tonnes, with a value of about US$ 4,790,000 (assuming a value of US$ 5 per tonne carbon sequestered). The project will also result in the release of about 170,000 ha of Miombo woodlands from slash-and-burn agriculture, and in a reduction in encroachment of Kasanka and South Luangwa national parks and two Game Management Areas, which are crucial for the protection of global biodiversity. In addition, the project will bring a substantial improvement in farmers’ income and food security.

The sustainable land management technologies and extension approaches that will be pioneered by the project are potentially applicable throughout the high rainfall zone of Zambia, and scaling up of these technologies and approaches will further increase the impact of the project in terms of carbon sequestration and biodiversity. The project could also set valuable precedents which will place Zambia in a position of comparative advantage to draw down resources from the Clean Development Mechanism, should these become available to support net reductions in atmospheric carbon levels resulting from changes in land management systems.

Incremental Costs


The total budget of the ASIP successor programme is not yet known. The GEF project will cost US$ 1,350,000, of which US$ 747,000 is being requested from GEF. The GRZ will contribute US$ 253,000 from its own resources (in kind) and, through a World Bank loan as part of the ASIP successor project, another US$ 350,000 will be co-funded. The Mkushi Agricultural Co-operation has indicated that it is willing to co-operate with the project with regards to the logistical aspects of the provision of support to farmers (in particular making lime available to the farmers), and several NGOs (CLUSA, ZNFU-CFU) have indicated that they will be able to take part in the training of extension officers. The costs per component are presented in Table 1.

C. Project Budget



Budget
The budget for the proposed project, per component, is shown in Table 1. The budget of the project per category is shown in Table 2. The proposed funding will be closely linked to the on-going Agricultural Sector Investment Programme (ASIP), a stepping stone for the development of new sustainable farming technology. ASIP will end December 2001, but the ASIP successor project is expected to become effective in mid 2002. A more detailed budget is presented in Appendix 7.

Table 1. Budget, per Activity

Component/Activity

GEF

Government (in kind)

ASIP

Project total (US$)

Component A. Supporting studies

49,000

40,000




89,000

A1: Assessment of sustainable farming techniques

4,000







4,000

A2: Assessment of potential community-based ecosystem management techniques

20,000







20,000

A3: Targeted research

25,000

40,000




65,000

Component B. Capacity building

116,000

45,000




161,000

B1: Start-up workshop

6,000







6,000

B2: Training of trainers

100,000

45,000




145,000

B3: Curriculum development workshops

10,000







10,000

Component C. Promotion of sustainable land management in Mkushi and Serenje districts

302,000

53,000




355,000

C1: District level workshops on integrated ecosystem management

5,000







5,000

C2: Implementation of FFS

178,000

53,000




231,000

C3: Enabling farmers to obtain the required inputs

79,000







79,000

C4: Support to communities in implementing integrated ecosystem management

40,000







40,000

Component D. Scaling up of the sustainable land management approach

10,000




350,000

360,000

D1: Sustainable land management workshop.

10,000







10,000

D2: Promotion of sustainable land management in other parts of the Miombo woodlands







350,000

350,000

Component E. Project management, monitoring and evaluation, and information dissemination

270,000

115,000




385,000

E1. Project Management

170,000

115,000




285,000

E3. Monitoring and evaluation

70,000







70,000

E2. Information dissemination

30,000







30,000

Total

747,000

253,000

350,000

1,350,000



Table 2. Budget, per Category

Category

GEF

Other sources

Project total (US$)

PDF:

0

0

0

Personnel:

80,000

90,000

170,000

Subcontracts (including consultancies):

143,000

140,000

283,000

Training:

244,000

289,000

533,000

Equipment:

130,000

25,000

155,000

Travel:

6,000

0

6,000

Evaluation mission(s):

45,000

0

45,000

Miscellaneous:

99,000

59,000

158,000

Project total:

747,000

603,000

1,350,000


D. Implementation Plan
Project Implementation
The project will be implemented over a four year period. Project management will be the responsibility of the Land Husbandry Section of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries (MAFF). A project manager will be appointed at the District level, to be based in either Mkushi or Serenje town. He/she will take care of the day to day management of the project, as well as reporting to central level MAFF. Salary, transport and office equipment will be provided by the project, whereas an office and support staff, in one of the existing local offices of MAFF, will be provided by the Government. The project manager will handle the budget for all district level activities, and will also have a separate budget (US$ 5,000 a year) for miscellaneous expenditure (operation and maintenance, farmer visits, consultancies, transport, etc.). He/she will work together with the Mkushi and Serenje District Agricultural Co-ordinators and Senior Agricultural Officers.
At the central level, a part-time project co-ordinator will be appointed in the Land Husbandry Section of MAFF. Salary, office equipment and transport for the central level project co-ordinator will be provided by the Government. The Steering Committee for the CF Programme will provide guidance on strategic issues, periodically review achievements and address any other relevant issues arising during implementation.
The envisaged timing of project activities is presented in Table 3. There will be a mid-term review by the end of the second year or early in the third year, as well as an ex-post evaluation when the project is about to be finished. The TOT should start just before the beginning of the growing season, in September or October. This means that the project should start around March-April in order to have sufficient time to finalise the supporting studies and start-up workshop prior to the start of the TOT.
Table 3. Project Implementation Plan

Duration of Project : 48 months

Component / Activity

Project-months

Component A. Supporting studies

6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48

A1: Assessment of sustainable farming techniques

++

A2: Assessment of potential community-based ecosystem management techniques

++++

A3: Targeted research

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Component B. Capacity building




B1: Start-up workshop

+

B2: Training of trainers

+++++++++

B3: Curriculum development workshops

+ + +

Component C. Promotion of sustainable land management in Mkushi and Serenje districts




C1: District workshops on integrated ecosystem management

+

C2: Implementation of FFS

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

C3: Enabling farmers to obtain the required inputs

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

C4: Support to communities in implementing integrated ecosystem management

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Component D. Scaling up of the sustainable land management approach




D1: Sustainable land management workshop.

+

D2: Promotion of sustainable land management in other parts of the Miombo woodlands.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Component E. Project management, monitoring and evaluation, and information dissemination

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Procurement
The Ministry’s Procurement and Supplies Unit will be responsible for procurement of goods and services. Procurement will be carried out in accordance with the Bank’s Guidelines for Procurement under IBRD loans and IDA credits (Published in January 1995, revised in 1996, 1997 and 1998). Consultant services will be obtained following the ‘Guidelines for the Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers’. MAFF will maintain detailed records of all procurements financed by the GEF. The Ministry’s Financial Management Unit, set up as part of the institutional reform programme sponsored by ASIP, will provide accounting and disbursement services.
In order to facilitate timely disbursements of funds, all funds related to the district level activities will be passed on to the district level in advance. This includes funds for the TOT, the FFSs, local research activities and workshops, etc. The District level project manager will be responsible for managing the district level budget. He/she will also have a small budget for day-to-day and miscellaneous expenses and will have the authority to disburse funds up to US$ 500 without prior consent of the central level MAFF. The expenses will be controlled annually by MAFF’s Financial Management Unit, applying procedures developed for the ASIP.

E. Public Involvement Plan
Stakeholder Identification and Participation
Besides the GEF and the World Bank, the main stakeholders in the project are: (i) the national and district administrations who have a stake in ensuring sustainable management of the woodlands as well as food security for its inhabitants; (ii) MAFF land husbandry and extension staff who will have the main responsibility for the implementation of the project; (iii) community beneficiaries who will benefit from improved farming methods; (iv) the poorest sections of the farmer communities, including in particular female headed households, who will be able to ensure food security with low inputs of cash and labour; and (iv) the private sector who would co-operate with the project by providing assistance in setting up a lime distribution facility. All these stakeholders will be involved in the planning of the project’s activities through participation in the various workshops to be organised (in particular the start-up workshop and the district level workshops on sustainable land management).
Information Dissemination and Consultation
Information dissemination and consultation are important elements of the project’s design. The project will start with an assessment of potentially suitable CF and IEM techniques (Activities A1 and A2), and the results of these studies will be incorporated in the TOT and FFS curriculum, as well as presented in two district level workshops (Activity C1). Farmers’ representatives will also be involved in the preparation of the FFS curriculum. The project will organise yearly workshops to discuss the proceedings of the FFSs in CF and IEM, and the adoption of sustainable land management by local communities. The dissemination of information to local communities will be further supported through the organisation of farmer-to-farmer exchange visits. In a national Sustainable Land Management Workshop (Activity D1), the first results of the project will be presented to policy makers, local and national government staff, community representatives, NGOs, and staff of other relevant development projects, such as the GEF supported Community-based Natural Resources Management and Biodiversity Conservation in the Lukanga Swamps project. Relevant experts and policy makers from neighbouring countries with Miombo woodlands (Tanzania, Democratic Republic of Congo) will also be invited. Finally, the project includes a (co-funded) component to promote sustainable land management in other parts of Zambia (Activity D2), and an information dissemination campaign aimed at the information of neighbouring countries as well as the global community of the outcomes of the sustainable land management approach to be developed under the project.

F. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan
Project monitoring and evaluation will be carried out at two levels: the field level and the project level. In the first session of the FFS, the participants will be asked to provide the following information: number of participants, names of the participants, gender, area under cultivation, crops grown, and expectations of the participants regarding the FFS. At the last session of the FFS the farmers will evaluate if the FFS has fulfilled their expectations, positive and negative aspects of the FFS, their opinion about options for and constraint to CF and IEM, and their intended use of CF and IEM in the subsequent year. In addition, the number of participants following the FFS to the end will be recorded. In the subsequent years, the extension officer will, during one of his/her follow-up visits, record the actual amount of farmers practising CF, the actual area under CF and the implementation of community-based IEM activities. For each FFS, a record will be held in the district project office.
At the project level, the following indicators will be monitored: (i) total number of FFS facilitators trained; (ii) number of FFS conducted; (iii) number of farmers trained; (iv) percentage of female farmers trained; (v) number of farmers having started CF; (vi) hectares cultivated with CF; (vii) number of communities that have taken up IEM; and (viii) grants disbursed to farmers. This will be a continuous activity, to be implemented by the project manager. He/she will have a separate budget for monitoring activities.
The budget also includes provisions for the mid-term review and ex-post evaluation of the project. Mid-term review will be undertaken by an international consultant (two months). It will include an assessment of the progress of the project, and in particular of the effectiveness of the CF, IEM and FFS activities. The consultant will provide general technical backstopping, and will provide recommendations for project implementation in years three and four. In addition, a preliminary estimate will be made of the impact on carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation1. The mid-term review would overlap with the organisation of the sustainable land management workshop (Activity D2). The ex-post evaluation will also be done by an international consultant with experience in CF, IEM and participatory extension through FFS, and will result in a final evaluation of the achievements of the project, including an analysis of the environmental and food security benefits, as well as recommendations for further scaling up of the sustainable land management approach.
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