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Fall 2007 Analysis of the Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing Program And the Associate Degree in Nursing Program Compiled for the Nursing Program by Kathryn Wood, R. N. C., M. N


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Fall 2007 Analysis of the

Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing Program

And the

Associate Degree in Nursing Program
Compiled for the Nursing Program by

Kathryn Wood, R.N.C., M.N.

Unit Representative and Department Chair

Nursing Program

University of Guam

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

Fall 2007 Analysis of the Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing Program


  1. External recognition and measures of quality of the program (listed).

The Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program was established in 1988. At that time, the program was reviewed by the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners (GBNE), receiving approval. An annual report is submitted to GBNE, with current information about the program. There has been continuing approval of the program by GBNE since 1988.


The Program received initial accreditation by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) in 1996 for a period of five years. This is the maximum length of time awarded for initial accreditation. In 2002, the Program underwent review by NLNAC, and was awarded continued accreditation until 2010. This is the maximum length of time awarded for re-accreditation.
These two external review processes attest to the quality of the program.
In addition, the Nursing Program is approved by the State of California Department of Consumer Affairs, Board of Registered Nursing to be a Continuing Education Provider (Provider Number CEP 13823). This Provider Number allows the Nursing Program to provide needed Continuing Education presentations for nurses to renew their nursing licenses.
Professor Karen Cruz was recognized by Guam Nurse’s Association as Guam’s Nurse of the Year in 2005.
Dr. Maria Salomon was granted an Honorary Nurse Educator award by Guam Nurse’s Association in 2006.
Professor Kathryn Wood was recognized by Guam Nurse’s Association as Guam’s Nurse of the Year in 2007.


  1. All course outlines have been revised to reflect both program and course Student Learning Outcomes and assessment plan in place (copy of assessment plan and program SLOs).

All course outlines address the 10 Characteristics of a Graduate from the BSN program (Student Learning Outcomes):

- Professionalism


          • Creative and Critical Thinking

          • Nursing Process

          • Communication

          • Caring

          • Cultural Competence

          • Research

          • Ethical and Legal

          • Management

          • Leadership

Syllabi are available upon request. Grading rubrics are used across the

program, integrating increasing complexity. Samples of the grading rubrics

for Nursing Process and Critical Thinking are attached.


Currently, all courses are taught face-to-face. However, the nursing faculty

are currently striving to convert courses for distance delivery. This will assist

students in the region who wish to complete a BSN to shorten the length of

time they will need to relocate to Guam, and potentially could assist other

nursing programs in the region through course/faculty sharing.
The BSN Program Evaluation (Assessment) Plan is attached.


  1. Centrality to Mission (one paragraph statement).

The Baccalaureate Nursing Program is committed to the mission of a Land Grant university serving the people of Guam and the Western Pacific island communities, as reflected in our Academic Master Plan and Mission Statement. The Academic Master Plan is attached. The mission of the Baccalaureate Nursing Program is to:


1. Offer professional nursing education to the culturally and academically diverse population of the region. To realize this mission, the Program:

a. provides non-nurses, registered nurses, and graduate nurses undergraduate studies in nursing;

b. implements, evaluates, and refines the curriculum to produce culturally competent, caring nurses who think creatively and critically, and meet national professional nursing standards;
2. Increase the body of nursing knowledge through research and creative endeavors. To realize this mission the Program:

a. encourages faculty and students to participate in research, projects, programs, and advanced study;

b. conducts and disseminates findings of research and health-related projects.
3. Serve the culturally diverse peoples and health care providers of the region. To realize this mission the Program:

a. offers continuing education and consultation in person and through distance technology;

b. provides leadership to raise standards, enhance health and well-being, and promote collegiality between providers.
This mission is congruent with the mission of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, as well as that of the University.


  1. Support of Strategic Initiatives (which ones and how).

Academic Quality:



    1. As students enter the nursing program, and as they transition from 200 to 300 level coursework, a transition workshop is held to assist students progress in the curriculum. At the present time, a workshop is under development for the 300 to 400 level transition.

    2. Students are given the opportunity to evaluate each course at mid-term and end of each semester. Any feedback reflecting need for change is reviewed by course and level faculty.

    3. Students complete the NLN Achievement tests relevant to the content covered in the curriculum each semester. Review of the test results provides information to support curricular changes.

    4. End of program exit interviews have consistently indicated that students are satisfied with the quality of the program, and feel prepared to enter the nursing workforce.

    5. Surveys of employers of our graduates at 1- and 5-years out from the program give consistent satisfaction with the quality of our graduates. Surveys are based on ratings of competency in the 10 characteristics of a graduate from the program, and supporting comments.

    6. With the current nursing faculty shortage, the program has relied more heavily on adjunct faculty support, primarily for clinical supervision. In response, an adjunct faculty mentorship training program was developed. All adjunct faculty undergo the on-going training from full-time faculty.

    7. Two faculty members are American Heart Association Basic Life Support Trainers.

    8. One faculty member is an American Heart Association/American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program Regional Trainer.

    9. One faculty member is nationally certified in Inpatient Obstetric Nursing.

Student Success, Enrollment Growth and Institutional Visibility

1. Graduates from the Nursing Program must successfully complete NCLEX-RN in order to become licensed to practice nursing within the United States and U.S. territories. Our first-time pass rate has exceeded the national benchmark of 75% since 1992.


  1. The BSN Program has had a significant increase in enrollment in the Program, in both pre-nursing and nursing majors, over the past several years. Class sizes have increased, but will be limited in Spring 2008 due to faculty shortages.

  2. The students, faculty, and administration implement a “Family Day” each year to interact with families. This provides a time for exchange of information about program activities, and for students to share their experiences with family members.

  3. The Student Nurse’s Association of Guam has won awards from the National Student Nurse’s Association (NSNA) for the past two years, reflecting increasing membership with NSNA.

Community Engagement



  1. The nursing students, faculty, and administrator actively participate in college night and new student orientation.

  2. The nursing students, faculty, and administrator are very involved in community outreach, by participating in health fairs and research conferences on island.

  3. Students have an active student organization that is visible in the community relevant to various health care issues.

  4. Faculty and Administration are active in professional organizations and boards.

  5. One faculty member hosts “Isla Health Talk”, a show on KPRG radio.

  6. Faculty members collaborate with Guam Nurses Association (GNA) and Guam Memorial Hospital in offering NCLEX-RN reviews and Continuing Education Programs.

  7. The Nursing Administrator is the current President of the Guam Nurses Association.

  8. One faculty member chairs the Commission of Nurse Leaders for Guam Memorial Hospital.

  9. One faculty member is editor of the Ramas Ubas, GNA Newsletter.

  10. One faculty member is vice-chair of the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners.

  11. One faculty member serves on the Civilian Military Taskforce (CMTF).

  12. One faculty member is an NLN Ambassador.

  13. Most faculty members and the administrator are members of Sigma Theta Tau, the honor society for nursing.

  14. Faculty members serve as liaisons between UOG and various health care agencies on island.

  15. Nursing faculty and the administrator are active participants in the American Pacific Nurse Leader’s Council (APNLC), which bring together nurses from the American-Associated Pacific Islands to discuss issues relevant to nursing practice and research.

  16. The nursing program is collaborating with World Health Organization and the University of Hawaii nursing program for a Nursing Education Mapping project for the Pacific region.

  17. Nursing faculty members provide Continuing Educational programs via satellite to the region.

  18. Nursing faculty and administration provide consultation to Guam Community College and the College of Micronesia regarding new program development.

  19. The Nursing Program produced a Nursing Progress Report in 2005, and a Nursing flyer in 2007.

  20. Nursing students and faculty present findings of their research at the GNA and CLASS conferences annually.

  21. A Community Health field experience in Yap was recently approved as an off-island transcultural experience.

Samples of these activities are available upon request.




  1. Meeting student and regional needs (evidence to support this).

A nursing shortage exists worldwide. Guam and the Pacific region are not exempt from the nursing shortage. The Nursing Program has provided a steady supply of nurses to Guam, the Pacific region, and the United States mainland since it’s inception. Graduates help to ease the shortage in government and private agencies and clinics. Several graduates currently fill leadership positions. Many graduates have completed master’s degrees. One graduate is currently completing work on a doctorate. Much of this advanced education is due to private grant support awards for graduate education and continuing education. The Nursing Program serves to help meet the nursing health care needs of Guam and the Pacific region.




  1. Completed program reviews, with recommendations acted upon (last review and actions taken).

The BSN Program was reviewed in 2002 by the Academic Committee on Undergraduate Programs. Their review commended the “students, faculty, staff and administrators of the Nursing Program for their outstanding work”. Their recommendations were to 1) “substitute the NLNAC Self Study report for the program review by ACUP”, and to 2) propose that the SVP “use the Self-Study Report and recommendations made by the NLNAC to formulate her decisions regarding further developments and resource allocations pertaining to the Nursing Program”.


Patterns of concern listed in the 2002 NLNAC report included:

  1. Deans workload;

  2. Program evaluation

One previous pattern of concern was revised to be a Point of consideration:



  1. Academic qualifications of faculty, as evidenced by: all faculty do not hold a master’s in nursing degree

Based on the recent reorganization within the School, the concern relevant to the Dean’s (now Director’s) workload should be alleviated. The program review plan has been reviewed, and will be revised to reflect 2008 NLNAC accreditation standards.


An interim report was requested by NLNAC 2 years following the 2002 review to address a) Faculty qualifications; and b) NCLEX pass rate.
Based on that interim report, “The Commission accepted the interim report of the baccalaureate degree nursing program and affirmed the next accreditation visit for Spring 2010.”

University of Guam

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

Fall 2007 Analysis of the Associate Degree in Nursing Program


  1. External recognition and measures of quality of the program (listed).

The Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) Program was re-established in 2006. At that time, the program was reviewed by the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners (GBNE), receiving approval. An annual report is submitted to GBNE, with current information about the program.


While the ADN Program has not been reviewed by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), the pre-requisites and the 200 and 300 level coursework remain the same as the Baccalaureate in Nursing Science (BSN) Program. Communication with NLNAC has indicated that the ADN Program should undergo initial accreditation review as soon as possible, but the senior administration at UOG recommends this review be concurrent with the BSN program review in 2010.


  1. All course outlines have been revised to reflect both program and course Student Learning Outcomes and assessment plan in place (copy of assessment plan and program SLOs).

All course outlines address the 10 Characteristics of a Graduate from the ADN program (Student Learning Outcomes):

- Professionalism


          • Creative and Critical Thinking

          • Nursing Process

          • Communication

          • Caring

          • Cultural Competence

          • Research

          • Ethical and Legal

          • Management

          • Leadership

Syllabi are available upon request. Grading rubrics are used across the

program, integrating increasing complexity. Samples of the grading rubrics

for Nursing Process and Critical Thinking are attached.


Currently, all courses are taught face-to-face. However, the nursing faculty

are currently striving to convert courses for distance delivery. This potentially could assist other nursing programs in the region through course/faculty sharing.


The ADN Program Evaluation (Assessment) Plan is attached.


  1. Centrality to Mission (one paragraph statement).

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is committed to the mission of a Land Grant university serving the people of Guam and the Western Pacific island communities, as reflected in our Academic Master Plan and Mission Statement. The Academic Master Plan is attached. The mission of the Associate Degree Nursing Program is to:


1. Offer basic nursing education to the culturally and academically diverse population of the region. To realize this mission, the Associate Degree Program:

a. provides non-nurses associate degree studies in nursing;

b. implements, evaluates, and refines the curriculum to produce culturally competent, caring nurses who think creatively and critically, and meet national basic nursing standards;
2. Increase the use of research studies to impact nursing care. To realize this mission the Associate Degree Program:

a. encourages faculty and students to read acknowledged research;

b. applies research findings in nursing practice.
3. Serve the culturally diverse peoples of the region. To realize this mission the Associate Degree Program:

a. offers continuing education in person and through distance technology;

b. identifies how effective leadership can contribute to raising standards, enhancing health and well-being, and promoting collegiality between providers.
This mission is congruent with the mission of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, as well as that of the University.


  1. Support of Strategic Initiatives (which ones and how).

Academic Quality:

1. As students enter the nursing program, and as they transition from 200 to 300 level coursework, a transition workshop is held to assist students progress in the curriculum.

2. Students are given the opportunity to evaluate each course at mid-term and end of each semester. Any feedback reflecting need for change is reviewed by course and level faculty.

3. Students complete the NLN Achievement tests relevant to the content covered in the curriculum each semester. Review of the test results provides information to support curricular changes.

4. With the current nursing faculty shortage, the program has relied more heavily on adjunct faculty support, primarily for clinical supervision. In response, an adjunct faculty mentorship training program was developed. All adjunct faculty undergo the on-going training from full-time faculty.

5. Two faculty members are American Heart Association Basic Life Support Trainers.

6. One faculty member is an American Heart Association/American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program Regional Trainer.

7. One faculty member is nationally certified in Inpatient Obstetric Nursing.
Student Success, Enrollment Growth and Institutional Visibility

1. The BSN Program has had a significant increase in enrollment in the Program, in both pre-nursing and nursing majors, over the past several years. With the initiation of the ADN Program, several students have opted for the ADN Program. Class sizes have increased, but will be limited in Spring 2008 due to faculty shortages.



  1. The students, faculty, and administration implement a “Family Day” each year to interact with families. This provides a time for exchange of information about program activities, and for students to share their experiences with family members.

Community Engagement



    1. The nursing students, faculty, and administrator actively participate in college night and new student orientation.

    2. The nursing students, faculty, and administrator are very involved in community outreach, by participating in health fairs on island.

    3. Students have an active student organization that is visible in the community relevant to various health care issues.

    4. Faculty and Administration are active in professional organizations and boards.

    5. One faculty member hosts “Isla Health Talk”, a show on KPRG radio.

    6. Faculty members collaborate with Guam Nurses Association (GNA) and Guam Memorial Hospital in offering NCLEX-RN reviews and Continuing Education Programs.

    7. The Nursing Administrator is the current President of the Guam Nurses Association.

    8. One faculty member chairs the Commission of Nurse Leaders for Guam Memorial Hospital.

    9. One faculty member is editor of the Ramas Ubas, GNA Newsletter.

    10. One faculty member is vice-chair of the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners.

    11. One faculty member serves on the Civilian Military Taskforce (CMTF).

    12. One faculty member is an NLN Ambassador.

    13. Most faculty members and the administrator are members of Sigma Theta Tau, the honor society for nursing.

    14. Faculty members serve as liaisons between UOG and various health care agencies on island.

    15. Nursing faculty and the administrator are active participants in the American Pacific Nurse Leader’s Council (APNLC), which bring together nurses from the American-Associated Pacific Islands to discuss issues relevant to nursing practice and research.

    16. The nursing program is collaborating with World Health Organization and the University of Hawaii nursing program for a Nursing Education Mapping project for the Pacific region.

    17. Nursing faculty members provide Continuing Educational programs via satellite to the region.

    18. Nursing faculty and administration provide consultation to Guam Community College and the College of Micronesia regarding new program development.

    19. The Nursing Program produced a Nursing Progress Report in 2005, and a Nursing flyer in 2007.

    20. Faculty present findings of their research at the GNA and CLASS conferences annually.

    21. Community Health field experience in Yap was recently approved as an off-island transcultural experience.




  1. Meeting student and regional needs (evidence to support this).

A nursing shortage exists worldwide. Guam and the Pacific region are not exempt from the nursing shortage. The ADN Program was established to provide a means for quicker entry into the nursing workforce. Graduates will fill nursing vacancies in government and private agencies and clinics.




  1. Completed program reviews, with recommendations acted upon (last review and actions taken).

The ADN Program underwent the initial review process prior to it’s establishment in 2006. It is not currently due for additional program review.


The ADN Programs has undergone initial review by the Guam Board of Nurse

Examiners, and is approved.


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