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Biol 425. Mammalogy Fall 2010 Instructors


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BIOL 425. Mammalogy

Fall 2010
Instructors:
Edward C. Murphy

Phone: 479-8224



ecmurphy@alaska.edu

Office Hours: M, W, 2-3 pm or by appointment)


Todd Brinkman

Denali Building, 2nd floor

474-7139

tjbrinkman@alaska.edu

Office hours: Monday 10-12 am (or by appt.)


Teaching Assistant: Dashiell Feierabend

Irving I, Rm. 408

474-7162

dfeierab@alaska.edu

Office hours:


Course Credits: 3.0

Location: Lecture in Irving I, Rm. 201; Lab in Irving I, Rm. 103

Time: Lecture 1-2 MW; Lab 2-5 T.

Prerequisites: BIOL 317 and Junior or higher standing or permission of instructor.


Course Objective:
The purpose of the course is to review aspects of the basic biology, evolution, ecology and importance of mammals today and in the past. Class format will consist of lectures and laboratories; laboratories will focus on features of orders and families of mammals worldwide, identification of Alaskan mammals to genus and species and natural history of Alaskan mammals.
Performance will be evaluated on the basis of exercise and exams in both lecture and laboratory. Attendance is not taken, however, it is expected that students attend each session; this is particularly so on exam days; often there will be in-class quizzes and discussions that form part of the final grade. Any planned absences, for example, UAF sport events for team members, must be brought to the attention of the instructors before it occurs. The instructors will work with the Office of Disabilities Services to provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities.
All study specimens will be available during laboratory sessions; however, they are maintained in locked cabinets at other times. Taking specimens out of the laboratory (Irving I, Rm. 103) is not permitted. Specimens will be available for review prior to scheduled exams. FOOD AND DRINK MAY NOT BE BROUGHT INTO THE LABORATORY.
Lecture Schedule

Meeting

Date

Instructor

Topic

Reading (Chapter in Feldhamer et al. or other)

1

Sept. 8

Murphy

Pleistocene environments and mammals of Alaska




2

Sept. 13

Murphy

Caribou

Guthrie, Whitten

3

Sept. 15

Brinkman

Mammal characteristics

Why study mammals?



Approaches to studying mammals.

Chapter 1 & 3

4

Sept. 20

Brinkman

Evolution & Dentition

Chapter 4

5

Sept. 22

Brinkman

Biogeography & Zoogeography

Chapter 5

6

Sept. 27

Brinkman

Communication & Sexual Selection

Chapter 21-22

7

Sept. 29

Brinkman

Mating Systems & Social Behavior

Chapter 22-23

8

Oct. 4

Brinkman

Landscape Ecology

Chapter 24

9

Oct. 6

Brinkman

Population Ecology

Chapter 25

10

Oct. 11

Brinkman

Community Ecology and Review

Chapter 26

11

Oct. 13

Brinkman

Midterm I




12

Oct. 18

Brinkman

Mammal classification

Handout

13

Oct. 20

Brinkman

Perissodactyla; Artiodactyla

Chapter 20

14

Oct. 25

Murphy

Adaptation and speciation




15

Oct. 27

Murphy

Monotremata; Marsupialia

Chapter 11

16

Nov. 1

Murphy

Afrosoricida, Erinaceomorpha, Soriciomorpha, Macroscelidea, Scandentia, Dermoptera

Chapter 12

17

Nov. 3

Murphy

Chiroptera, evolution of flight

Chapter 13

18

Nov. 8

Murphy

Chiroptera: echolocation




19

Nov. 10

Murphy

Primates

Chapter 14

20

Nov. 15

Olson

Mammals of Madagascar




21

Nov. 17

Murphy

Midterm II




22

Nov. 22

Murphy

Midterm II Review;

Rodentia and Lagomorpha



Chapter 18

23

Nov. 24

Murphy

Xenarthra, Pholidota, Tubilidentata; Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, Sirenia

Chapter 15

Chapter 19, Forsten and Youngman



24

Nov. 29

Murphy

Cetacea

Chapter 17, Mueller, T. 2010. Nat. Geog. 218(2):118-137

25

Dec. 1

Murphy

Cetaceans: Trophic cascade hypothesis

Chadwick, D.H. 2005. Nat. Geog. 207(4):86-105.

26

Dec. 6

Murphy

Carnivora I

Chapter 16

27

Dec. 8

Murphy

Carnivora II (pinnipeds)

Chapter 16

28

Dec. 13

Murphy

Serengeti Mammals: ecology and conservation




29

Dec. 15




Final Exam




Textbook: Feldhamer, G.A. et al. 2007. Mammalogy. 3rd edition WCB/McGray-Hill.

Additional readings: These will be posted on the Blackboard site or we will provide a link for electronic access before the assigned date.

Additional media:

"Life of Mammals" film series by David Attenborough

Lab Schedule

Date

Instructor

Topic

Exercise

Chapter Readingb

Sept. 7

Murphy

Introduction to live-trapping of small mammals and red squirrel observations







Sept. 14

Murphy

LARS: caribou, reindeer, and muskox: identification, physiology, and behavior







Sept. 21

Brinkman

Live-trapping of small mammals

Traps & trapping

30

Sept. 25-26

Brinkman

Denali field trip (moose rut)




Handouts

Sept. 28

Brinkman

Tour of UA museum; importance of collections

(START snowshoe hare track observations)



TBA

TBA

Oct. 5

Brinkman

The Orders of mammals; craniodental and skeletal characteristics

Key & keying

8,9

Reference 2&3



Oct. 12

Brinkman

Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla

Identification, aging, horns & antlers

5, 26, 27

Oct. 19

Brinkman

Lab Test I







Oct. 26

Murphy

Monotremata; Marsupialia; Afrosoricida, Erinaceomorpha, Soriciomorpha, Macroscelidea, Scandentia, Dermoptera




10,11,12,13,15,21

Nov. 2

Murphy

Chiroptera, Primates




14,16

Nov. 9

Murphy

Xenarthra, Pholidota, Tubilidentata; Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, Sirenia




17,18,24,25

Nov. 16

Murphy

Rodentia, Lagomorpha




22-23

Nov. 23

Murphy

Cetacea, Carnivora (part)




19-20

Nov. 30

Murphy

Carnivora




19

Dec. 7

Murphy

Lab Test II







b Martin, R.E., et al. 2001. A Manual of Mammalogy. 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill. 333 pp. NOTE: As an alternative, you will have full access to an electronic version of James Patton’s Lab Manual for Mammalogy (UC Berkeley)
Note: Laboratory assignments will include field exercises both during the laboratory and outside of class; dress appropriately for wet, cold weather on days we will be outside!

Grading policy:

Final grade will be calculated as follows: Lecture (65%); Lab (35%).

Letter grade: A (100-90); B (89-80); C (79-70); D (69-60); F (below 60).
Components of grade:

Item

Date

% of grade

1. Midterm I

October 13

15

2. Midterm II

November 17

15

3. Final

December 15

15

4. Lab test I

October 19

15

5. Lab test II

December 7

15

6. Research Paper

Due December 1

10

7. Lecture quizzes, assignments

Periodically

10

8. Lab assignments (Field observations; in-class presentations)

Periodically

5


Notes (These correspond to item numbers listed above.)
2,3 Midterm II and Final will not be comprehensive, but could include questions about linkages between concepts and materials covered earlier and lecture and those covered since the previous exam.
4,5 Lab tests will focus on identifying distinguishing characteristics of orders and families and identifying Alaskan and North American specimens to genus and species.
6. Research paper should be 8-10 pages of text (double-spaced) and should include about 8-10 references from the scientific literature. For ideas, look through the bibliography in the textbook, journals such as the Journal of Mammalogy, or talk to one of us. Before finalizing your topic, check with one of us.
7. There will be unannounced worksheets, short quizzes, and discussion readings in lecture. You will be expected to come to class with a short list of written comments and questions about the reading assigned for that lecture.
8. There will be assignments for field observations near the Irving Building that you will be doing in small groups outside of the lab and lecture time periods.
ON-LINE INFORMATION FOR MAMMALIAN SPECIES

Alaska Dept. Fish and Game, Wildlife Notebook Series:



http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/notebook/notehome.php
Mammalian Species Accounts (American Society of Mammalogists):

http://www.science.smith.edu/departments/Biology/VHAYSSEN/msi/


Animal Diversity Web (Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan):

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/index.html








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