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4. 0 Specific Policies for Stirling Ridge and Attunga Point


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4.0 Specific Policies for Stirling Ridge and Attunga Point


    The following tables identify specific heritage management policies and actions for the Stirling Ridge and Attunga Point component of the Lake Burley Griffin Study Area. These policies and actions provide detailed management frameworks for the range of places identified in the Study Area. The effective implementation of both the general and specific policies will ensure that the National Capital Authority meets both its obligations under the EPBC Act and community expectations to conserve the heritage values of the Lake Burley Griffin Study Area. Priorities and timing are as defined at the beginning of Section 3.0.



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 1

Sewer Vent No. 1





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—A, G

Attributes

Masonry sewer vent and the subterranean line of the sewer.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

The sewer vent is weathered but generally in sound condition. It requires ongoing condition monitoring and interpretation of its heritage value.

The condition of the sewer below the vent is unknown.



Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C1-1 Conserve the heritage values of Sewer Vent No. 1.

C1-1.1 Keep the sewer vent clear of woody weeds. Clear weeds manually. If the weeds encroach on the masonry, poison and remove only when dead.

Medium

Annually

C1-1.2 Monitor the condition of the vent and undertake maintenance or repairs as required.

Medium

Annually

C1-1.3 Consult an experienced heritage advisor regarding repair techniques and materials, if repairs to the fabric of the sewer vent are required.

As required

As required

C1-1.4 Investigate the condition and integrity of the ovoid masonry sewer, constructed 1917–1924, related to Sewer Vent No. 1.

Low

By 2014

Interpretation










C1-2 Interpret the historic and social heritage values of Sewer Vent No. 1, using a range of media.

C1-2.1 Include Sewer Vent No. 1 in themed heritage trails around Lake Burley Griffin.

Low

By 2014

C1-2.2 Install interpretative signage at Sewer Vent No. 1 which explains the history and heritage significance of the vent.

Medium

By 2011



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 2

Indigenous Site—Scarred Tree





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—C, I.

Attributes

The 20m high Scribbly gum Eucalyptus rossii. The unoccluded scar is an ovoid area 110cm in length and 45cm in width. There is some potential for the scar not to be of Indigenous origin; therefore it is classed as a ‘possible’ Indigenous scar (on a scale of possible, probable or definite). Alternative explanations for the origins of the scar are mechanical damage and damage from stock animals.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

The tree appears healthy at present and requires ongoing protection from unintended impacts such as damage during works programs and fire threats.

The tree requires management in consultation with Indigenous stakeholder communities.



While the location of the tree should not be signposted, the Indigenous cultural values of the Study Area should be interpreted.

Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C2-1 Actively conserve and protect the scarred tree, in consultation with Indigenous stakeholders.

C2-1.1 Information regarding the description and specific location of the scarred tree should be recorded on the NCA’s register of places of Commonwealth heritage value, in accordance with s341ZB (1) of the EPBC Act, and on the ACT Heritage Register.

High

Immediately

C2-1.2 Protect the surrounding ground within the likely root zone of the tree (which is approximated by the overhead spread of the canopy), from impacts such as filling, excavation, compaction, or the construction of sealed or paved surfaces.

High

As required

C2-1.3 Prepare documentation to be included with Service Contracts which notifies contractors of the heritage values of the scarred tree and ensures effective implementation of these policies by all contractors.

High

By 2011

C2-1.4 Where required, as part of the ongoing conservation management of the tree, trimming of limbs and limb removal should be allowed, where this does not directly impact on the scar or its regrowth. The lopping or trimming of the tree should only be undertaken by a qualified arborist.

Medium

As required

C2-1.5 Regularly remove any build up of flammable material around the base of the trunk, such as dead wood and leaf litter, to reduce the potential for impact from fire.

Medium

Annually

C2-1.6 Note the location of the tree on fire control plans as an asset requiring protection and management.

High

Immediately

Interpretation










C2-2 Interpret the Indigenous heritage values of Stirling Ridge and Attunga Point.

C2-2.1 Interpret the Indigenous heritage values of Lake Burley Griffin foreshores, acknowledging past and present Indigenous uses and cultural values of the area.

Consider the development of an Indigenous cultural values walking trail around the lake in partnership with Indigenous stakeholder communities.



Medium

By 2014

C2-2.2 Do not divulge the exact location of the scarred tree to the general public through interpretive signage or written material.

High

Immediately

Stakeholder Consultation










C2-3 Provide for appropriate participation of Indigenous stakeholders in management of Indigenous cultural heritage values.

C2-3.1 Provide and facilitate access to the scarred tree by appropriate Indigenous community members for the conduct of traditional or culturally significant activities.

Consult with the appropriate Indigenous community members regarding any management issues which arise that may affect the scarred tree.



High

As required



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 3

Location of former Westlake Settlement





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—A, G

Attributes

The physical remnants of buildings, infrastructure and garden plantings remaining on the site. Ongoing association of ex-residents and their descendents with the place.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

Only vestigial remnants of the former Westlake settlement survive, following demolition of the houses and ‘clean up’ of the site in the 1960s. Other archaeological remains of earlier European settlement and work may also exist on the site. The remnants themselves do not require active management but may require protection form further impacts.

Installation of plaques and signs, as well as publications on the history of the place, show that the association of ex-residents and their descendents with the place remains strong.1









Existing signage at settlement site

Former garden plantings at settlement site

Concrete remains at settlement site

LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 3

Location of former Westlake Settlement

Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C3-1 Conserve and respect the social and historical heritage values of the site of the former Westlake settlement and of other European archaeological evidence which may be present in the Stirling Ridge area.

C3-1.1 Ensure the physical remnants of the place are protected and respected in any management regimes for this area.

Medium

Immediately

C3-1.2 Prepare documentation to be included with Service Contracts which notifies contractors of the heritage values of the former Westlake settlement site and ensures effective implementation of these policies by all contractors.

Medium

By 2011

C3-1.3 An archaeological assessment may be required as part of proposals which require excavation in this area.

Medium

As required

C3-1.4 Prepare plan of management for vegetation which recognises values of ornamental plantings and potential weed infestation and run-off impact.

Medium

By 2011

Interpretation










C3-2 Interpret the social and historical heritage values of the former Westlake settlement site, in partnership with key stakeholders.

C3-2.1 Consult with stakeholders to determine appropriate forms of interpretation, celebration or commemoration of the former Westlake settlement.

Medium

By 2011

C3-2.2 Include the site in a historically themed heritage walking trail around the lake.

Low

By 2014

Stakeholder Consultation










C3-3 Identify stakeholders for the former Westlake settlement site and consult on its future management and any issues affecting the place, on a regular basis.

C3-3.1 Provide and facilitate access to the site of the former Westlake settlement for stakeholder and community groups with an interest in the place, for the conduct of ceremonies, events etc.

High

Immediately

C3-3.2 Consult with stakeholder and community groups with an interest in the place regarding any actions or activities which might have an impact on the place.

High

Annually and as required



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 4

Button wrinklewort habitat

Australian National Botanic Gardens Photo: a.9866





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—B, C.

Attributes

The habitat of the Button wrinklewort is located in patches throughout Stirling Ridge and is estimated at 70,000 plants. Button wrinklewort is a declared threatened species under the Nature Conservation Act 1980 (ACT) and listed as a threatened species, EPBC Act.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

Service contractors require clear management objectives for this area and detailed management guidelines for protecting Button wrinklewort populations.

Areas of Button wrinklewort are disjunct and some are very small. Increasing disturbance pressure makes targeted management difficult.

The open (not wooded) areas of Stirling Ridge and Attunga Point are subject to routine mowing which has an adverse impact on the species.

There is extensive eucalypt and wattle regeneration which produces overshadowing in excess of grassy woodland conditions and reduces Button wrinklewort habitat.

Infestations of woody weeds are reducing Button wrinklewort habitat.

There is a lack of a comprehensive fire hazard management and wildfire suppression plan.

Disturbance is being caused by informal pathways and uncontrolled access.

There are extensive, invasive grass weeds including ‘weeds of national significance’ (such as Chilean needle grass).









General view of Stirling Ridge grassy woodland.

Button wrinklewort at Stirling Ridge.

Button wrinklewort habitat at Stirling Ridge.



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 4

Button wrinklewort habitat

Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C4-1Implement Threatened Species Action Plan No. 8 (Button wrinklewort) under the Nature Conservation Act 1980 (ACT)—with emphasis on woody and herbaceous weed control and regeneration of native species.


C4-1.1 Develop and implement site works (including fencing, signage and control/closure of access and paths) to consolidate disjunct areas of Button wrinklewort habitat within Stirling Ridge. The objective is to link the east and west populations of Button wrinklewort, north of the Westlake settlement site clearing.

This plan should be developed in conjunction with plans to consolidate the woodland areas (see below).



High

By 2011

C4-1.2The proposed extension of Empire Circuit is likely to have an adverse impact on the Button wrinklewort population should it proceed.

High

Immediately

C4-1.3 Gather existing data from monitoring the results of management regimes employed to date, combined with relevant surveys and studies2, to develop a clear program of best practice management activities which will be strictly implemented and monitored. In this way, best practice management and maintenance of Button wrinklewort will be refined and become progressively more effective.

The management program should include specific threat abatement responses including:



  • a mowing regime applicable to Button wrinklewort survival (addressing timing and height of cut);

  • removal of eucalypt saplings to reduce overshadowing and maintenance of the grassy woodland structure;

  • significant resources directed towards the destruction and removal of woody weeds for Button wrinklewort habitat sites; and

  • control of Chilean needle grass.

High

By 2011

C4-1.4 Develop and implement a fire hazard management and wildfire suppression plan for Stirling Park which incorporates the ecological sensitivities of Button wrinklewort in its hazard reduction schedules. Seek data on the fire sensitivity of Button wrinklewort. In the absence of such data, any hazard reduction burning should be completed before August each year.

High

By 2011

C4-2 Ensure that service contracts for asset management (including mowing, weed control and fire hazard management) are consistent with the protection and conservation of identified historic, indigenous and natural heritage values.

C4-2.1Prepare documentation to be included with Service Contracts which:

  • identifies the Button wrinklewort plant, its habitat and known occurrence areas;

  • provides a statement of heritage value and outlines legislative responsibilities for the protection and management of a scheduled species; and

  • clearly states the priority and emphasis of management activities in the Button wrinklewort areas.

High

By 2011

Documentation, Monitoring and Review










C4-3 Monitor and document all management activities to ensure the development of best practice activities.

Monitor the long-term ecological sustainability of Button wrinklewort population under the implemented management regime.



C4-3.1 All management activities, including objectives, timing, materials used and measurements/maps of activity area should be documented at the time of the activity. Documentation should be standardised through a designed reporting format. Following activities, the results should be monitored and assessed against activity objectives.

Medium

Annually

C4-3.2 The ecological sustainability of the Button wrinklewort population under the nominated management regime should be monitored. Positive results should be fed back into refining best practice management activities. Negative results will indicate the need to reassess the management process and objectives.

Medium

Annually



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 5

Yellow box—Red gum grassy woodland





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—B, D, E

Attributes

The Yellow box—Red gum grassy woodland occurs on the slopes of Stirling Ridge, throughout Stirling Ridge. It is listed as a threatened ecological community under the EPBC Act and as a threatened ecological community under the Nature Conservation Act 1980 (ACT). The remnant vegetation in this location consists of a mosaic of Yellow box—Red gum woodland, ridgetop Scribbly gum-Brittle gum forest and the ecotone between them. Policies and actions apply to all remnant vegetation.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

Service contractors require clear statements of management objectives for specific areas and detailed management prescriptions for protecting the endangered ecological community.

Historical clearing and disturbance to the area between the Westlake Settlement site and Attunga Point has isolated a small northern area of woodland and separated the larger eastern and western woodland stands.

There is extensive eucalypt and wattle regeneration which produces a tree density in excess of grassy woodland conditions and reduces community health.

Infestations of woody weeds and wattles in disturbed areas and spreading into the woodland.

Lack of a comprehensive fire hazard management and wildfire suppression plan.








Eucalyptus melliodora in Stirling Ridge.

Eucalyptus blakelyi in Stirling Park.

Eucalyptus rossii on Stirling Ridge.

LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 5

Yellow box—Red gum grassy woodland

Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C5-1 Implement ACT Lowland Woodland Conservation Strategy, Action Plan No. 27 under the Nature Conservation Act, 1980 (ACT)—with particular emphasis on management and rehabilitation, with appropriate regeneration, restoration, and reinstatement practices.

C5-1.1 Gather existing data on monitoring the results of management regimes employed to date, combined with relevant surveys and studies3, to develop a clear program of best practice management activities which will be strictly implemented and monitored. In this way, best practice management and maintenance of the grassy woodland will be refined and become progressively more effective.

The management program should include specific threat abatement responses including:



  • removal of eucalypt saplings to reduce overshadowing and maintenance of the grassy woodland structure;

  • significant resources directed towards the destruction and removal of woody weeds and wattles; and

  • treatment of special vulnerable areas (including electricity easements and along drainage lines).

High

By 2011

C5-1.2 Develop and implement site works (through fencing, signage and control/closure of access and paths) to consolidate the areas of grassy woodland in the north-central area of Stirling Ridge. This will include an important area of Button wrinklewort on the fringes of the grassy woodland (see above).

High

By 2011

C5-1.3 The proposed extension of Empire Circuit is likely to have an adverse impact on the grassy woodland and should not proceed.

High

Immediately

C5-1.4 Develop and implement a fire hazard management and wildfire suppression plan for Stirling Ridge which is appropriate for the maintenance of grassy woodland structure and floristics, and the ecological sensitivities of Button wrinklewort, in its hazard reduction schedules.

The plan should include strategies to address the high fire hazard posed by the planting of unsuitable species (E bicostata and E viminalis) on the hazard perimeter (western side) of Stirling Ridge.



High

By 2011

C5-2 Ensure that service contracts for asset management (including mowing, weed control and fire hazard management) are consistent with the protection and conservation of identified historic, indigenous and natural heritage values.

C5-2.1 Prepare documentation for attachment to Service Contracts which:

  • provides a statement of heritage value and legislative responsibilities for the protection and management of an endangered ecological community; and

  • clearly states the priority and emphasis of management activities in the woodland areas.

High

By 2011

Documentation, Monitoring and Review










C5-3 Monitor and document all management activities to ensure the development of best practice activities.

Monitor the long-term ecological sustainability of the grassy woodland community under the implemented management regime.



C5-3.1 All management activities, including objectives, timing, materials used and measurements/maps of activity area should be documented at the time of the activity. Standardise documentation through a designed reporting format.

Medium

Annually

C5-3.2 The ecological sustainability of the grassy woodland community under the nominated management regime should be monitored. Positive results should be fed back into refining best practice management activities. Negative results will indicate the need to reassess the management process and objectives.

Medium

Annually



LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 6

Remnant grassland





Heritage Values

Commonwealth Heritage Values—D, E

Attributes

Two small areas on either side of the Attunga Point headland which are remnants of the pre-European vegetation (much disturbed). The western segment is significantly disturbed and is too small for successful conservation management. The eastern area is in fair condition and warrants conservation management.

Management Issues, Condition and Integrity

Service contractors require clear statements of management objectives for specific areas and detailed management prescriptions for protecting natural temperate grassland communities and Button wrinklewort populations.

Attunga Point is subject to routine mowing which has an adverse impact on the remnant grasslands.

Impacts are caused by public access and high usage levels of adjacent lands.

Presence of invasive grass weeds including ‘weeds of national significance’ (such as Chilean needle grass).









Fenced, eastern grassland portion.

Western grassland section—mown.

Button wrinklewort on Attunga Point.

LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

Component 6

Remnant Grassland

Policies

Actions

Priority

Timing

Heritage Conservation










C6-1 Implement ACT Lowland Native Grassland Conservation Strategy Action Plan No. 28 under the Nature Conservation Act to manage and rehabilitate grassland areas.

C6-1.1 Develop a clear program of best practice management activities which will be strictly implemented and monitored. In this way, best practice management and maintenance of remnant grassland will be refined and become progressively more effective.

The management program should include:



  • a mowing regime applicable to native grassland species and Button wrinklewort survival (addressing timing and height of cut);

  • control of weed species;

  • access control (fencing already completed); and

  • interception drains to divert silt runoff from the bare areas uphill.

High

By 2011

C6-1.2 Prepare documentation for attachment to Service Contracts which:

  • provides a statement of heritage value and legislative responsibilities for the protection and management of a scheduled species; and

  • clearly states the priority and emphasis of management activities in the grassland areas.

High

By 2011


4.1 Endnotes


1 See for instance Gugler, Anne 2000, ‘A History of Stirling Park’ Canberra Historical Journal, pp 16–28.

2 Muyt, A 2006, Stirling Ridge, Yarralumla: Vegetation Survey Methods, Management Issues & Flora and Fauna Species Lists, report prepared for the National Capital Authority, Canberra (unpublished). Boden, R 1994, Conservation and Management Plan for Native Vegetation on National Land Managed by the National Capital Authority, report prepared for the National Capital Authority, Canberra (unpublished).

3 Muyt, A 2006, Stirling Ridge, Yarralumla: Vegetation Survey Methods, Management Issues & Flora and Fauna Species Lists, report prepared for the National Capital Authority, Canberra (unpublished). Boden, R 1994, Conservation and Management Plan for Native Vegetation on National Land Managed by the National Capital Authority, report prepared for the National Capital Authority, Canberra (unpublished).

Lake Burley Griffin and Adjacent Lands—Heritage Management Plan, Volume 2, Stirling Park and Attunga Point—Final Report, October 2009


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